Industry Legislation

NIA Board Moving Quickly, Acting Independently

What started in 1992 as an offshoot of NAILS Magazine to organize professional nail technicians and be a vehicle to provide low-cost insurance, is now a trade organization to be reckoned with.

The Nails Industry Association (NIA) is finally hitting its stride. What started in 1992 as an offshoot of NAILS Magazine to organize professional nail technicians and be a vehicle to provide low-cost insurance, is now a trade organization to be reckoned with. This past June, the membership installed a new board of directors at the NAILS Show in LasVegas, and that board has been developing its agenda for the coming year.

The board, which serves for two years, consists of four dynamic individuals: Nilsene Privette of Phoenix, Ariz., and Maggie Boyd of Barrington, III., both of whom are past directors of the NIA and have been very active in industry politics, are  joined by Debbie Krakalovich of Toronto, Ontario and Shari Finger of W. Dundee, III. (You probably recognize these names as Salon of the Year winners).

Tops on the board’s list of goals for 1997 are to see its long-awaited Certification Program in place and training technicians, and to set up regional chapters. NIA has contracted with leading industry expert in nail education to develop the framework for the program (which is to be ready for training by fall 1997).

Regional chapters are being launched in Canada, Arizona, and IIIinois so that members can network and problem-solve with technicians in their area. The emerging Canadian chapter represents a tremendous stride not just because of the international influence, but because there are no licensing regulations in Canada at this time.

The board has also decided to lower its dues and restructure benefits. It’s a radical move, but the board thought it essential to build its numbers even stronger.

NAILS Magazine is encouraged by the independence and decisiveness of the new board. Although the NIA is directly connected to NAILS, we know that for NIA to be a true force of change and leadership in the industry, it must be independent and driven by its board of working professionals. We’re ready for that and we wish them well!

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