carpal tunnel syndrome


Carpal Tunnel Syndrome includes pain, numbness, and muscular weakness in the thumb, index, and middle fingers, caused by compression of a major sensorimotor nerve at the wrist, usually due to inflammation, trauma, or injury caused by repetitive motion; nail technicians are prone to this condition because of the repetitive nature of their work, but it can be prevented or alleviated with proper work habits. Carpal tunnel syndrome and other repetitive stress disorders can be prevented. The best possible scenario is never to develop symptoms, to work intelligently, and to respect your body’s signals. At the workplace, you can do on-the-job conditioning, perform stretching exercises, take frequent rest breaks, wear splints to keep wrists straight, and use correct posture and wrist position.

Keywords:   carpal tunnel syndrome     ergonomics     nail diseases  

Required Reading

Personal Trainer: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

January 22, 2013

Addressed early, there are at-home prevention and management techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome, though in certain cases, surgery may be needed.

Hurting Hands

November 1, 2009

What if no doctor or medical study could confirm it, but through a network of your peers you learned many nail techs develop similar pain in their wrists, fingers, and thumbs? Would you choose to proactively reduce your risk of pain based only on anecdotal evidence?

Ouch! The Downsides of Success

December 1, 2007

Successful nail techs boast a loyal clientele, a respectable income, and immeasurable workplace perks. They also endure frequent neck and back pain, sore thumb and fingers, and eye strain. You can’t have one without the other – or can you? Take a look at these common maladies and see what can be done to avoid the downside of success.

Carpal Tunnel: Take Matters Into Your Own Hands

July 1, 2002

Once viewed as “ New-age alternatives,” massage, acupuncture, and the Alexander techniques are gaining ground as conservative approaches to preventing and alleviating the painful and sometimes debilitating symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.

Don’t Lose Your Grip With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

February 1, 2001

Having a repetitive-motion injury—such as carpal tunnel syndrome—doesn't mean the end of doing nails, but you should make adjustments in your work techniques and see a doctor before the condition gets worse.

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