Q&A

I understand how allergic reactions work, but I am very perplexed at the high incidence of it I’m having lately. Please help.

Q.

In my 21 years of doing nails, I’ve had about eight people become allergic to acrylic monomer. However, in the past year I’ve had six clients become allergic. I’ve been using the same product for about five years and have had no problem until recently. I contacted the manufacturer to see if they knew of any problems and they didn’t. I understand how allergic reactions work, but I am very perplexed at the high incidence of it I’m having lately. Please help.

A.

Allergic reactions can occur with any type of enhancement products. The vast majority of client allergies are caused by the nail technician repeatedly exposing the client’s skin to the enhancement product. Prolonged or repeated skin contact is most often the cause. Allergies usually occur after four to six months of repeated exposure. The result is often red, dry, cracked, or irritated skin around the cuticle area. If ignored, the symptoms can progress to form small water blisters. The second most common cause of client allergies is using too wet of a mix ratio. If your bead is too wet, clients can become allergic. Too wet of a mix ratio usually causes the nail bed beneath the plate to itch or feel “warm.” Using too large of a brush is sometimes the culprit. Larger brushes increase the chance of accidentally contacting the skin. A very large brush also holds excessive amounts of monomer, which can cause nail technicians to work too wet. — Doug Schoon

Leave a Comment

Name:
Email:
Comment:
Submit

Comments (0)

Encyclopedia

Callus ia a completely natural acquired, superficial, round, and thickened patch of epidermis caused by pressure or friction on the hands or feet....
Learn More

Subscribe to NAILS & SAVE!

Get a free preview issue and a Free Gift
Subscribe Today!

Please sign in or register to .    Close
Loading...
 
Subscribe Today
Subscribe Today