Client Health

Extend Pedicure Season With Targeted Treatments

Make pedicure season a year-round proposition by offering targeted services that address clients' individual lifestyles and unique needs.

By using a targeted approach, you can take steps toward improving customer service and client relations at your salon. Here are six potential clients and how you can cater to their needs.

1. HIGH-HEEL WEARER

Special considerations:

  • Corns, calluses, and, bruised toenails are common.
  • Keep the client’s toenails short to help prevent ingrown toenails.
  • If your client is suffering from neuromas, suggest that she alternate days of wearing high heels with wearing flats.   

Ambiance: Burn a floral scented candle and play trendy music.

Snack suggestion: A mineral foot soak with ingredients such as potassium, iron, and calcium can help revitalize the skin.

Spend extra time on: Hydration. Use a highly emollient moisturizer since wearing high heels causes pressure points on the foot can result in skin breakdown and calluses.

Beverage: Complimentary glass of wine or champagne

Add-on options: Simultaneous facial mask, heated neck wrap

2. ATHLETE

Special considerations: 

  • Athletes may want to keep their calluses to lessen the impact of running, lifting weights, etc., so ask before reducing it.
  • Cut toenails short and in a straight line to avoid ingrown toenails.
  • Be careful not to pop blisters. If the client has popped blisters, it is essentially an open wound, and a pedicure should not be performed.

Ambiance: If you have a TV in your salon, offer to put on a sporting event. 

Soak suggestion: Epsom salt, which is known for its muscle-relaxing effects.

Spend extra time on: Offer clients an extended massage that includes the feet and lower leg.

Beverage: Flavored water, kombucha  

Add-on options: Retail a product to reduce foot odor; offer to upgrade to a hot stone massage.

3. CANCER PATIENT

Special considerations:

  • Be especially conscientious with your sanitation efforts. Be sure to wear gloves and do not nip their cuticles.
  • Oncology clients may have some common nail symptoms, including beau's lines and onycholysis, so be aware of iregular nail conditions.
  • Use gentle, natural products without a strong scent, since many oncology clients are hyper-sensitive or prone to nausea.
  • Some chemotherapy can cause the soles of the feet to be tender, dry, or peel, almost resembling a sunburn. If you notice this, use a highly emollient lotion and mssage very gently.

Ambiance: Provide a quiet, spa-like environment and play relaxing music. On the flipside, if you have a lively salon, some oncology patients may enjoy socializing and welcome focusing on topics other than their health.

Soak suggestion: Do not soak in water because of the potential introduction of bacteria. Suggest a waterless pedicure instead. Use lukewarm water to wash off their feet and apply shea butter.

Spend extra time on: Gentle Swedish-style massage.

Beverage: Iced pink lemonade

Add-on options: A bentonite clay mask will help draw out impurities. Leave on for 20 minutes, then rinse and dry with warm towels.

4. MALE CLIENT

Special considerations:

  • First-time male clients may feel out of plave, so go out of your way to make sure they are comfortable.
  • Male clients may be taller and wider than majority of your female clients. Ensure that you have at least one or two chairs that are wideset to accommodate a large man (or an overweight client of any gender).
  • Consider offering a special rate for couples' services to entice female clients to bring in their significant others.

Ambiance: Pick a private area (possibly curtained off) and provide a gender-neutral chair for him to sit on. Play new age music or early rock 'n' roll, depending on your salon's style.

Soak suggestion: Keep it simple. You don't want to scare off male cliets with overly floral scents or fancy scrubs that they may perceive as feminine.

Spend time on: The essentials. You will probably not be polisihing the toes of most male clients, so take extra time on their cuticle sand calluses.

Beverage: Complimentary beer, wine, or soda

Add-on options: Offer an extra 10-minute massage or an upgrade to a mud mask on the legs.

5. ELDERLY CLIENT

Special considerations:

  • Nails on elderly clients have more difficulty adhering to the nail bed, making them more susceptible to onycholysis. Clean under the nails extremely gently, if at all.
  • Massage more gently than you would with a younger client due to the presence of varicose veins, frail skin, etc.
  • Develop a referral relationship with physicians for clients who have nail and skin concerns.

Ambiance: Music at a low enough volume to be talked over; bright lighting and menus with larger text   

Soak suggestion: Soak the feet for no more than five minutes with a pH-balanced hydrating foot soak; Salt- and acid-based products are harsher on the skin. You may also use a warm towel compress instead of a soak.

Beverage: Green tea, wine

Add-on options: Heated eye masks, anti-aging hand treatments, and paraffin dips to soothe aching joints

6. PREGNANT CLIENTS

Special considerations:

  • Pregnant clients may experience swelling, especially in their feet, because of their sudden weight gain.
  • Offer pillows as some expectant mothers have back pain.
  • Ensure maximum ventilation due to occasional nausea among pregnant women.

Ambiance: Moms-to-be have a lot to worry about, so a relaxing environment is best. However, some pregnant women may want to gab about their excitement, so gauge their mood.

Soak suggestion: Avoid any soaks that have essential oils. While essential oils are used to enhance relaxation, emmenagogues can stimulate blood flow in the pelvic area and uterus, and can be potentially harmful to a pregnant client.

Spend extra time on: Lightly massage the calf for longer than you might otherwise.

Beverage: Water, since it will help reduce swelling, or herbal teas, such as chamomile or peppermint

Add-on options: Offer a neck, shoulder, or hand massage in lieu of her leg massage. A free toe wax is a nice treat for the client who can no longer see her feet.

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