Hot Off the Presses

NAILS Hits the Newsstand

What would it look like if all magazines were nail magazines? We re-imagined 11 popular consumer magazines — from Modern Bride to Natural Health to Smart Money — to predict what they might look geared toward the nail world.

Work Pain-Free
[Advice from the NMC on healthy ergonomics for techs]

> When sitting keep the spine back in a neutral position, not leaning forward or backward. The head, neck, and body should face forward without twisting or hunching. The backrest should support the lower back. The head should be kept upright and shoulders relaxed. Avoid twisting the neck.

> Avoid leaning too far forward while performing manicures or pedicures. Do not bend the back forward more than 30 degrees or the neck more than 45 degrees. Avoid reaching more than 12 inches and keep forearms parallel with the floor at the side.

> Raise and position the client’s hands or legs and feet to prevent bending or stretching forward or supporting feet with your own body. A recliner chair works well and supports the client’s legs in the best position for servicing her.

> When holding a client’s hand or finger, position it so that the pressure from grasping is minimized; a relaxed hold will lessen the strain. Gently move your client’s hand rather than tilting your head. In order to prevent neck strain, consider placing a client’s hand on a rest that elevates the hand.

> Adjust chair height so your thighs are parallel to the floor with your feet flat. If necessary, use a footrest to keep your feet flat and don’t cross your legs or sit sideways in the chair. Choose a high-quality, swivel chair with a seat at least one inch wider on each side than your hips and thighs and properly padded so that it doesn’t create a pressure point (behind the knees, for example).

 

No Sweat Service Extras
[Easy customer service ideas you implement today]

> Really listen to what clients are saying (and what they aren’t) so you can offer exactly what they’re looking for. Responding to suggestions from clients, even small ones, lets them know you really are listening and you care about their business.

> When a client goes on a vacation, give her an index card that includes all of the information (brand, color, tip size, special needs, etc.) about her nails in case she needs to get a repair or a new set while she’s out of town. This lets your client know how important she is to you; plus, it helps make sure nothing is applied to her nails that you don’t want there.

> Develop a repertoire of super-quick nail art designs you can offer at no charge. A few quick wisps, swirls, and dots will keep clients happy and feeling like they’re getting a good value. Even offer your brides free nail art as a gift; they’ll spread the word to all who see it.

> Offer a guarantee that’s reassuring and specific. Don’t make it a money-back guarantee, instead make it an “I’ll-make-it-right” guarantee. You might say “No lifting for two weeks.” or “Chip-free polish guaranteed for seven days.” By encouraging clients to come back to get the problem fixed, it assures them you stand behind your work.

> Follow-up with a phone call or postcard. Call a client a couple of days after her appointment to see if she is happy with her nails, how she is adjusting to them, and to thank her for coming into the salon. You could also send a thank-you postcard with a discount offer to her when she refers a friend or an offer that lets her extend a discount to her friends.

 

Keywords:

Leave a Comment

Name:
Email:
Comment:
Submit

Comments (0)

Encyclopedia

Rudolph International, Inc. has been a leader in the professional beauty industry since 1979, and owns over 22 trademarks and 9 patents with 5 patents...
Learn More

Subscribe to NAILS & SAVE!

Get a free preview issue and a Free Gift
Subscribe Today!

Please sign in or register to .    Close
Loading...
 
Subscribe Today
Subscribe Today