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What are reasonable terms for a non-compete contract?

Q: I live in a small town with two other nails-only salons that are not reputable and a lot of full-service salons that don’t do much with nails. I’ve been working for over six months now and just got asked to sign a non-compete contract. I’m curious about the terms of a normal non-compete agreement. The one they are asking me to sign is for three years with a 50 mile radius, which seems excessive.

What do you charge a client with super long nails?

What do you charge a client with super long nails? I have a client who gets acrylics with gel-polish on top. Her nails are triple the length of the average client. I feel like I’m using almost a full bottle of gel-polish and at least double of all the other product. And she never tips. How would you charge? And if I charge her more, how do I tell her?

The new products I’m using are adding time to each appointment. How do I adjust my schedule?

I have been doing wraps for over 20 years. The products I used to use have changed and the new ones are adding about 10 minutes to my appointment time. I used to be able to get a rebase done in an hour — complicated client or not. Now almost everyone is taking 10-15 minutes longer, so by the end of the day, I am really behind. More clients are asking for nail art now, too. I do my scheduling at the beginning of the year for the whole year. All my clients have standing appointments, so making adjustments in my schedule is next to impossible. How do I fix this? Should I do 1-1/2 hour appointments just in case someone wants nail art or the application requires extra time? Obviously, that would cost time and money. Also, I’m not comfortable with charging someone extra because it takes me longer to do her nails because she is harder on them than others. I am a one-person salon and I don’t take walk-ins, so there isn’t anyone to cover for me.

How do I get conversation going and not sit in awkward silence?

I am naturally a pretty quiet person who doesn’t like to talk much. But after doing nails for a year, I realize that talking to clients is a must during services if you want them to come back. I don’t know what to say besides asking questions basic questions like, “How are you?” and “Do you have any children?” How do I get conversation going and not sit in awkward silence?

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What should I do when clients have their check prepared for one service, but the price ends up higher?

I have been a nail tech for many years and I’ve never been good at standing my ground with clients. What should I do when they come in with their money (cash or check) already prepared for one service, but actually get a higher-priced service? For example, they need a repair on top of their fill, or if it’s been longer than three weeks since their last fill (which I charge more for). I’ve tried putting up signs but that hasn’t made any difference.

Should I have a TV in my salon?

My question is about TVs in the salon. How do I know what kind of programming to show? In talking to customers, some like it when the salon shows a new movie, others prefer a music channel, and some others just don’t want a TV at all. What’s your advice?

I’m thinking about not doing pedicures anymore and just specializing in traditional and gel-polish manicures. Any advice?

I’m thinking about not doing pedicures anymore and just specializing in traditional and gel-polish manicures. Most of my clients only get their hands done and honestly that’s what I love doing. I’ve never really enjoyed giving pedicures nor do I think I’m very good at them. A friend of mine is looking to make a change in salons so I thought about renting my room to her and I would move my manicure table into a smaller room in the building. My husband is worried that I’ll lose business to my friend, but I think that I’ll get more business from her and business from being more specialized in one area. Any advice?

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