Close

chemical safety

How to Properly Dispose of Common Nail Products

Throwing away nail polish? You’re putting your business at risk.

Read more

5 Questions to Ask When Choosing the Right Disinfectant for Your Salon

Disinfection is crucial for salon safety, but with so many products available, how can you choose the best one?

Doug Schoon on the Ingredient TPHP

A new study says TPHP is a toxic chemical found that can be in nail polish. Holly turns to industry Doug Schoon for facts.

Fire Damages Nail Polish Manufacturer Warehouse in Santa Ana, Calif.

San Francisco Recognizes Healthy Nail Salons

San Francisco’s Healthy Nail Salon Program aims to reward nail salons that make safer choices for their employees, customers, and the environment.

How Ventilation Reduces Solvents in Nail Salons

This video, from the Local Hazardous Waste Program in King County, Washington, shows the measurement levels of common nail salon solvents in the air, both with and without source-capture ventilation. Watch move videos on salon ventilation.

Are You Risking Your Health?

Sometimes it can be hard to separate fact from fiction when it comes to potential hazards associated with work in the nail industry. With persuasive voices on both sides of the issue, we wondered how many of you feel you are jeopardizing your health by working in the salon.

On My Mind: Fear Factor Doesn't Fly With Us

Risé Carter of NSI, Doug Schoon of CND, Paul Bryson of OPI, and numerous other manufacturers and nail techs have sent letters to Dr. Oz. I encourage you to do the same. Go watch the video and then click on the Contact Us link at the bottom of the page.

It's Getting Hot In Here

A rash of salon fires reminds salon owners just how much they stand to lose. Knowing the potential fire dangers that exist in your salon and taking steps to curb them, as well as determining what your business is worth and getting good insurance coverage will help prevent a fire in your salon and minimize its effects should the worst come to pass.

NIOSH Studies EMA

Artificial nail products are composed of various chemicals. The main ingredient for most artificial nail products is ethyl methacrylate (KMA). In 1974 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned a similar chemical, methyl methacrylate (MMA), for use in nail products because of its harmful effects during application. Despite the FDA ban, MMA is still found in trace amounts in some products.